Rocky Singh Kandola - A Great Survivor of Many Deaths LIVE with Daisy Oz

This week I interviewed an amazing survivor of a number of near death experiences – Rocky Singh Kandola – on Youth Crisis Solutions, Resilience in Tough Times & the Spirit of Overcoming the Impossible! He is a survivor of physical abuse, a convicted felon, and has had over a dozen near-death experiences! He now has emerged as a successful, inspirational Indian entrepreneur, operating several thriving businesses: The Manali Tea Company, Hair Maiden India, and Getaway Rentals. He speaks 4 languages and is an actor on IMDB.



Host:

Today I'll be speaking with an amazing survivor of a number of near-death experiences. Rocky Singh Kandola, and we'll be talking about youth crisis solutions, resilience in tough times in the spirit of overcoming the impossible as Rocky has. He is a survivor of physical abuse, a convicted felon, and has had over a dozen near-death experiences. He now has emerged as a successful inspirational Indian entrepreneur operating several thriving businesses. The modality company hair made in India, and I get away rental. He speaks four languages and is an actor for IMDV. So welcome, great survivor and inspiration for many Rocky things so much for having to miss Stacy it's. I'm happy to be interviewing you. Thank you. This is exciting to meet someone doing that taking something from their experience and helping others to do the same. I have a question about the dozen over a dozen near-death experiences. Is that correct?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

I was actually closer to eight to nine. But if you kind of count in all the small car accidents and all the things that the trucks are flipped and the in the ocean that they've been in the middle of the store, their boat, you can probably add to that nice easily.

Host:

Well, and were any of those like life after death experience? Like did you have any out-of-body experiences?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Not necessarily the out of body experiences, but when this happened to my face, I was actually assaulted, thrown into a concrete sidewalk where my entire jaw was crushed. Well, I now have metal here and fake teeth and everything for almost a year of my life. I was so under so much trauma from the physical stuff, as well as from the medications that they had me on that it was just, you know, a year of basically just out of mine, you know, I didn't know where I was at, what was going on. I wasn't able to eat properly. And you know, when everything first happened I was very, very close to possibly die if, you know, if I didn't get to the emergency room very, very fast. And somehow I, which I don't remember either somehow I walked into the emergency room, the ER myself and my jaw just like hanging half off my face. And you know, the doctors, they did an incredible job. They were able to save me and help me out during that.

Host:

So they, they were close enough to, to like life after death or what I call spiritual death. Those are, those are profound because they change us. There's the shift that goes on within us. And I think it helps us empty that personal self kind of, they have to go within a sense, and we take on a greater part of ourselves. So and I'm going to go into a little more background on you. You spent your high school life in nine different facilities, schools, and boot camps across the world. Some of which are now closed due to severe child abuse, rape and tortures. You had attempted murder shot at stab and kidnap bringing about those over or close to 20 major surgeries. Wow. from these grave and painful experiences Rocky, you say you wish to help people who are experiencing what you've experienced, how beautiful are high honours to you. In what ways do you feel you're making any of that?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So I feel like we all have our stirred stories and our journeys and things we go through. However, you know, these days, especially like, you know, in certain communities and certain cultures and certain, even racist and sexist these pains and these troubles and these things we go through are less talked about and kind of pushed under the rug what I've learned and what I've gained from my experience is talking about it, having community and sharing the story and then showing, you know, what you've done to overcome that is hugely impactful. For me personally, I was looking for mentors, you know, four or five years ago, I was in a rough stage in my life. And I was going through a separation with my ex-wife and I was feeling lost. Again, my business hadn't quite taken off how I wanted it to yet. And I was struggling to look for help from somewhere. And, you know, finally, I started reading YouTube books and re-watching YouTube videos and tuning into a lot of Ralph smart, you know Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer Alan Watts. And I was able to through their experiences and do what they were sharing with me to kind of really feel an impact and really understand you know, how to change, how to shift my mind and had motivation, inspiration from it. And that's kind of standing, I wish to deliver using my experiences, my story, the things I've been through, the mindsets, I used to have the identities to be tied with back then, I'm into transforming that into where I am now and how I was actually able to take those steps, which was quite a long journey. I'm still on that journey to get to where I am, you know, present-day right now.

Host:

I like how you sought out mentors. Is that something that you advise for the youth today?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Definitely, definitely. There are these days, you know, we're in an information overload, we have so much stuff being thrown at us from social media to television, to our communities, our groups. I think it's imperative that we start to actually consciously tune into more positive things to business things, even, even out there right now on YouTube and on books. There's so much out there. Even if you are a tennis player, if you're a musician, if you were looking for entrepreneurship, there are so many people out there that are speaking about their stories, about the positivity behind it, about the steps they took to get there. And those can be your mentors for me, those are my mentors, you know I reached out to them, had a funny story. I recently reached out to Ralph smart on his Instagram, and I've been following this guy for 40 years asset one thing. And following her spot of me, he said, oh, the blessings, thank you. I appreciate you. And I was like, well, finally, he heard me, but I've been telling him to thank you for four years, because he actually, and literally at a certain point in my life, a couple of years back saved me. And I was at a really, really dark place and tuning into his message and his positivity and his story of his struggles were those, let me relate to that. I too can do this. I have that power within me. And I felt very inspired to, you know, to move forward from me.

Host:

But what was his name again?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Ralph smart. He has a YouTube show called infinite waters. And since then I have turned to a lot more people, but Ralph smart was one of the first people when I was going through, I was going through the, you know, I was kind of really discussing dynamics and relationships and love and how we need to love ourselves more and tune into nature. And, you know, these kinds of smaller things to elevate ourselves. And then we can kind of meet people on the same plot and the same level playing field as us, instead of being attracting, you know, things that we actually don't want into our lives. And that, that was like the spark that, you know, got me into more YouTube videos and looking for more mentors and reading more books.

Host:

I think you've got a great point. There, there is a lot of information out there and to get out there and educate ourselves and make, as you said, a conscious choice to do that say rather than playing games or, you know, this, we're not, we're here to live and become better. And, and when we're happy and we satisfy ourselves in that sense and become more whole, we can help others. We're happier we can get out of those negative patterns. Very good. Yes. And educating ourselves, I'd like to address our youth and what you call that troubled teen industry. I'm going to back up a little bit which is mostly unregulated. It's a collection of for-profit programs that claim to rehabilitate out of control you between 50 and a hundred thousand adolescents currently spend at least part of the year in these facilities. This is shocking. Especially for a small town country girl. I was really surprised and there's a lot to be said about this and do that any more details on this juvenile justice system?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Yeah, I mean, that was my childhood, you know, I once my first one at 11 or 12, and then, you know, again in 17, and that's what I actually graduated high school from with a fate diploma, you know, these schools are, I said, they're, they're, for-profit businesses that claim to do these things and rehabilitation. And honestly, you know, I got a day, nothing could be farther from the truth, the amount of abuse and physical, mental sexual, everything that goes on in these places is just ridiculous. And I'm talking about when I went there, my first time was 1999 to 2004 saving on 2021. And finally, you know, these schools were being shut down and investigations are being started. And a lot of that was sparked by the TCI industry and the breaking code silence movement which was kind of, I wouldn't say pioneer, but definitely elevated by Paris Hilton doing a documentary about her time, she's back. And one of these schools in Utah recently called Provo canyon. You know, these schools, the ones I went to in particular we would be kidnapped out of our bed two o'clock in the morning with two big guys that are so tall that you have to turn the fan off in your room, just for them to stand in your bedroom. They would have your handcuffs and your feet cuffed already together. And they would escort you across the country to these remote, you know, undisclosed locations, all the way to your parents might know about it. That where they'd kind of start you in a routine of violence with the torture of mental games and brainwashing among all kinds of other things, you know, so when you first get there, you're basically, you're, you're sleeping in a hallway for 10 days on the ground You're woken up every morning, like the curse words and pots and pans banging together forced the count multiple times a day in the rain outside lay on the ground, you know the schooling there was just literally reading a textbook and taking the test out of the chapter. There was no communication allowed. And when I talk to each other, when I had to send out letters or mail to our parents, even without them being redacted and blacked out and, you know, really went through very intensive with a pen and paper though case matter does so medical care was basically not there. I remember being sick on a number of occasions in the first times I'd ask for help. Now I almost get, and I'll get in trouble breasts for help. So eventually I learned to just say, you know what, I'm not doing the same thing when I'm feeling sick, let me suck it up. So you know, that the biggest point in all of this is we got to remember this isn't a prison. This is an adult rehabilitation centre here, kids. I was 12 the first time, 17, the second time to put a kid in that kind of survival mode and take away from him the ability to learn and experience and grow and connect and have all the stages of life you go through as a teen, or is it a preteen even because a very dangerous thing to do to 50, to a hundred thousand people each year.

Host:

Is that still going on? This kind of thing, Rocky?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So the one I went to was called the WWASP that is just one of the TTI programs. There are hundreds of them now, and then under different names, they're under different ownership. You know, a couple of the big names, you know, Robert Litchfield that started the one that I went to they've even opened up different ones under different names. And there there's someone on today on this, as we speak, there are kids that right now, we actually have a Facebook survivor's group where we allow some parents that come in and there's a private group. We allow parents that are trying to decide where some, no kidding. If they're sending them to get off to these schools and the administration of these groups, they actually like, you know, but the research together, sees what schools have been you know, accused of violating this and that, what their literature looks like online and compares it to all the stuff that we've all went through and parents know that, Hey, you know, this might not be the best decision. These people are class one manipulators, and they're looking to make money and they make a lot of money. Some of these programs charge up to $30,000 per month, I think, per month or per 90 days for these kids to go to the schools there. And there's no schooling.

Host:

So given the facts and your firsthand experience, and then along with your entrepreneurial skills, what kind of solutions do you see that need to be made for such an epitome of a justice system? I mean, what, what do you see that needs to be done to change the changes?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Yeah. And we just, we discussed this a lot actually. And it's almost like an uphill battle, right? That the American justice system, I think we've all seen that in the past years is just flawed. There's no, like one answer I can say, okay, let's do this. Everything will be okay. I think the entire system from the ground up from, you know, the first responders to the judges into appellate courts need a complete overhaul in particular for child amnesty laws these groups, these businesses actually donate to presidential campaigns and elections, you know, obviously to gain favour, to keep certain bills and laws from being passed. So, I mean, that's one avenue right there is definitely, you know, you know, advocating for, for the law to be changed and girls will be passed on the same hand, as you didn't even know about it, many people still don't know about it. So the awareness, these, the res incorrectly greatly greatly greatly. And that's what, you know, talking on podcasts does. That's what many of my brothers and sisters that are survivors are attempting to do raising awareness, new communities and their families online via social media and where, you know, Paris Hilton came into play and kind of got a nice spark start underneath this stuff. I mean, this goes all the way, tend to like Dr Phil in the schools, he's sending kids to you know, major, major judges and political figures around the country. And I don't like to ever say that, you know, one person bad, and they're doing this, they're sending these kids there. A lot of times, Dr Phil and these people are just simply unaware and manipulated into thinking that, you know, despite this school is going to help a child. When you know that the studies have shown in time now has shown that the exact opposite is true. Most of the people that went to, these places are in very tough situations, mentally, spiritually, financially, physically, even, you know, many of them are incarcerated, dead, or, you know, in rehabilitation centre facilities across the country. I notice now because we weren't allowed to trade information with these schools. We weren't allowed to know what people's last names were from their phone numbers or anything. We had to all find each other after all these years on Facebook, through groups and apps.

Host:

Where are these schools? I'm having a hard time placing names and places of these schools. Yeah.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

They're everywhere. But they're smart enough to operate in small towns and remote locations, the deserts in the countries, in the farmlands of America and surrounding countries, Samoa, Mexico. There's a new one that just started up near the border of California and Mexico. If you, if you kind of do a search online for TTI, you'll see that, you know, even in Florida in the middle of like the Everglades area, the schools down there there's ones in Mississippi where my parents, parents and families hometown are, and they're all not part of the same program. They're all different levels. And we have gotten to the conclusion that some of these places actually are not at the very least not abusive. They're trying to not open there, actually some decent programs out there. You know, however, the majority of them, you got to think about it. You know, these are businesses, you know, like they operate, you know, just like private prisons in America, but they operate on keeping their beds full. If they don't keep their beds full, then you know, that they don't really can operate in business. So their motivations are not geared towards usually helping as much as, you know, taking advantage of and turn them into profit basically.

Host:

Well, it would be nice to see it turned around like you're saying into more positive programming and helping are you and stop the violence. I mean, it seems actually ridiculous. And so babyish and it's done self-serving so what other solutions do you see Rocky as an entrepreneur with your, also with your cultural experience influence your background in teaching our youth how can we enhance and propel them into healthier, healthier experiences and then bring them into their own greatness. So going in that direction, what do you see?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Definitely? So, I mean, in my generation growing up, you know, we didn't discuss too much of wellness too much of meditation and yoga too much of like, you know, general life situations that arise dealing with relationships, things like that. However, like the ship is already happening. Seeing the generations now, like there's always going to be divide people that I was gonna choose who they want kids as well. But there's a lot more of the younger generation now that is actually actively seeking out these types of things. And I believe that I believe two is twofold. I believe that we began with them because, you know, they are already on it and we get them to become voices as well. I'm in secondary something I believe very strongly is in any society, any community, the people that need the most help for the most attention are the ones that society in those communities kind of throw away your drug addicts, your mental, mental patients, your criminals so-called, you know, and that's what we need to place a lot of focus and attention to as well. The kids that are going through this that are thrown away, that doesn't solve. We, I mean, I think everyone can know common sense wise if you just possibly on the rug or put them to the side for a couple of years, that doesn't make the issue go away. It doesn't make things better. And that education all and that you know, kind of experience begins at a very young age if you're able to do it, even our school system, you know, teaching these curriculums of, of textbooks and in science and that the kids, you know, some somewhat useful science, mostly not, they're not learning about real-life situations about, like I said before, relationships about even some of them get out and don't know how to, like what filing taxes are like, how to like report this or that, or get a job or anything about business. And you know, when you empower someone, you know, with the knowledge to do that and to do more than den society had set out for them, you know, quote-unquote then you also give them the ability to volunteer greatness, to walk into the greatness you know, because they have the knowledge and the ability to do that and then build the confidence from there. And it does start with the kids, you know, it's so important.

Host:

On many podcasts in my happy news and there's lots of research out there in positive psychology is exactly what you're talking about, emotional intelligence getting them out in nature, getting out that the facts on getting out in nature are phenomenal for healing. They've done cases with menthol people having mental disabilities and improving just by being in nature, for example also highlighting their, their own greatness with what they're good at and what their purpose is and how they fit in the world. I've, I've read research on how that helps them especially the team because they want to figure out how they fit in the world. And they need to find their own strengths and their gifts within and going within meditation. Oh my goodness. I truly am a great advocate and believer because it shows us who we truly are, that we are more than what we're portrayed or brainwashed. As I like to say, we are great beings. We are quantum beings. We there, the quantum sciences is already proven all this. It's, it's catching up with the ancient teachings, spiritual leaders that we, many of us advocate too. And I, I see remedies and healing modalities for the youth, like teaching them to sound vibration getting into those sciences, learning beyond what's, beyond in what we're made up, really the quantum technology that's out there. And it goes back to what you said is going out there and getting educated on it. There's plenty of information out there. I mean, some of these words like sound therapy, tuning forks energy alchemy may sound boring, but they're not they're out there and they are true because it cannot be denied with the design, the mechanics of the universe is, in its structure and itself, and this solid subatomic level. So again, if learning, learning the science of our being, it's fascinating when we start going there. And I think that's, I think what you said about the meditation, I just want to preach to the choir here, giving it some an echo. Yes, and these dilemmas are, are huge. And the things that you've said about the system, and we're all just doing our part to pitch in and try to create this awareness. How do you feel where you're at right now in, in, in your movement, let's put it that way, or, and do you have a name for it?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

I haven't have made a name for you. I mean, obviously, I'm still like a baby in this I've. I like to say everything happens for a reason. So I do understand that everything I've gone through, I've kind of been on this path since I was a baby since I was a kid, however, I've only recently left the past like year or so, a couple of years really became actively aware of all of these different things. And if, you know, the thought patterns of my identities from before, and then, you know, once you become aware of it and you start believing, you can, you know, do better and do more, then you can kind of start making the shift into it. So right now, like I think my first started sharing my story and my podcasts on, on podcasts, you know, less than a year ago right now. And you know, it's during COVID as well. So I do plan on like, you know, being able to travel and to reach people and to speak, you know, all across the country and all across the world eventually as well. And to be totally honest with you and I did my businesses the same way, I don't really know, you know, which way it's going to go. I don't know which way is going to take off. I don't know which ways will be more impactful, but I'm very open to that and comfortable with that I'm happy with not, not knowing and just kind of doing and being a part of that journey the whole way there. Cause it's fun, you know, it's, it's a, it's a beautiful journey, the whole way. It's even the things that I went through, the word life and death, and that we're crazy and that we're like, I was in a very dark place. You know, I made it past every single one of those, my success rate and making a Passover is a hundred per cent. So I am here today and, and now it's all here for a reason to build, to share,

Host:

How do you do that? You just said, I just let my business go and go with the flow and see where it goes. I mean, I, we all deal with that. I'm dealing with that, you know, okay, here I am. I'm living on air. Where are we going? I don't know. How do you do, I mean, look at, look at that, what you said. I mean, you just sorta, first of all, your businesses are holding six figures. That's pretty good. I mean, congratulations. There's so much to be said about that, but how do you also, as an operating these businesses, just see where they go or how do you do that?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So I guess I said it kind of in a loose way. I, what my kind of thing is this, like have a plan, make a plan and then be very cool with tossing that plan aside and doing what comes in front of you. Right? So like I have certain things I do, especially in the beginning, I had certain things I would do each day. I would have like 10 different tabs open. I would work on different tasks in my business and I'll work on them every day. But if something else came up or something along, that was more interesting. I would hop into that as well. On top of that since day one, since I was a kid, I used to do the lemonade stands, I used to cut grass. I used to trade baseball cards. I've started multiple failed companies, you know, back in Alabama, but they weren't really a failure. I learned so much from them and got so much interaction with, you know, the marketplace and people there's eventually let me develop and develop and grow and grow. You know, about my past and my background, the reason I've gotten so much trouble after childhood was I dove into a lifestyle of drugs and partying and women and so on and so forth. And it was part of the entrepreneurial spirit that did it. It was just misguided, you know, at high school and in college. And in those kinds of years, like, we're all trying to, like you said, figure out where you fit in the world and what our identities are. And we think we have one we're going to grasp onto it and hold onto it. And mine was, you know, dope boy party animal, a drug dealer, this and that. And I was being called this by people and calling myself. And that's kind of what I grasped onto until I decided to make some shifts and changes in my life, you know, much later. But I kind of kept that mentality, like the, you know, entrepreneurial spirit of a hustler through my businesses as well. And I didn't know what was going to happen when I started my hair company. I actually started it just to, basically to, to when I was in a relationship, a new relationship, I was trying to show this family that I could do something. So I was like, I'm gonna try this. I'm gonna teach tennis on the side, have a job. And I'm going to try this hair company. And you know, there's multiple, multiple times when all, when I even look back and I was like, man, I don't know if I'm going to do this. I don't know it's going to work. I don't know what's going to happen. You know, I guess I'll see. And during that time was when I started other companies, I had other ideas when I would, you know, start to learn about tinker with social media and video editing and putting things online and making ads and all these things that I learned. Now I understand it. It can be translated to any business, anything I do. So I've kind of lost the fear of like, oh my gosh, do I have to hit this amount of sales? I have to do this and that. I know that with the tools and the things I've gained in the, you know, business world that I can kind of shift that into anything. So I allow myself the freedom and the, and the comfortableness of just kind of letting it flow. You know, the times I realize that when I try to really control it too much and put my finger down and hand down, things just don't go as well.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

And then I step away, I take a vacation, I'll go in for a week. Let the team that worked with me for a couple of years now just kind of handle things. And they're kind of entails a certain times as well, but I noticed that things are flowing. Things work better. Sales come in and the clients are happy. Nothing is just the world doesn't end. You know, so instead of stressing about it and being worried about it, I choose cautiously to pick, Hey, I'm going to let it flow. I'm going to let it be chill. It'll be okay. And that's, that's been around for me.

Host:

So I liked that. I call it looser living. Is it, I have to do the same with all my projects. And I get really, I mean, I have so many things, but what's your I'm looking at timelines, you know, building and in your company there with Hair Maiden India just curious about that time, where it started to where you lost that stress and it started to gain momentum.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So the idea for Hair Maiden India started actually, I'm sitting underneath a prison bunk in Alabama state penitentiary with a snuck in the cell phone, calling my bunkmates sister and her friends, asking them about, you know, the business and like what's selling, what's hot, how much it costs, how much do we need, et cetera. And that was a one-page business plan from there a couple of years later, I believe in 2014, right around 2014, I started, I was in India. I was I had the opportunity to be there and I was kind of making a lot of shifts in my life. And I wanted to get away from the lifestyle I was living and, you know, selling drugs, doing drugs and partying and waking up just to go off again. And I left behind all my friends, you know, my phones, my cars, my family, any drugs, I had music, television, everything, and just went there and kind of started over. From there it has been almost seven years now and it has been quite a journey. I have had jobs in the meantime, I have started other businesses in the meantime. I've had a marriage and a divorce in the meantime as well as other surgeries from, you know, my knees and my ankles, you know, trying to play tennis and teach that job and hurting myself. So I've had a lot of ups and downs. And during most of the time, I was kind of alone. I tried to hire people and I had this thing about hiring friends. I wanted, when I started my business, I was like, you know what? I want it to be me and my people, my community making money together and living life together and enjoying. And I've kept that in my heart since day one. And I realized that because the traditional businessman says, you know, no, no, no, don't hire friends. And I've learned why I've learned, why they say that. However, I'm a little bit hardheaded, so I haven't been able to change it. And I still like to hire people that I connect with and I vibe with them. I know. So ask your question. When things started to shift I spent three or four years between New Jersey, Atlanta and Alabama doing trade shows on the ground fobs, actually seven to 10 shows per year. Meeting people, I would Google hair extensions and go into salons and talk to people directly and build up this kind of credibility in this almost like the hype around the business, how Ross see too many sales. And I was doing, you know, good enough to at least, you know, have like the hope inside my heart that I can keep going. But the biggest shift for me came about four years ago when I came to Los Angeles the way the economy, the money was moving out here, the mouth of people I was meeting on finally, a level that, you know, don't respect anybody I knew in the past, but on an educational intellectual and spiritual level that I was getting myself to. I was blown away and I fell in love almost immediately. And when that happened, I also, at the same times when I and my ex-wife separated. So, you know, I'm, I'm, I'm here. I'm seeing this new lifestyle and boom, I'm hit with like a big life situation, your face. That kinda, it broke me a Crow. I mean, it almost took me back to my old days. You know, I went out where I was once two o'clock in the morning and Hollywood homeless in a minivan drink spending my money on drinks and a club and sleeping in the car outside type of thing. Until I finally had a friend come and live with me from Korea, a good friend of mine who kind of showed me, Rocky, like, you know, you don't have to fall back in and he didn't tell me this. He just kind of showed it to me that rock, you don't have to do the same things you did back home in Alabama. Los Angeles has a plethora of good high energy people, meditation centres, yoga centres, good eating, clean eating. And he showed me all of this just by example. And I, I fell right into it immediately. I started a chance to stop eating meat. I started working out more. I started doing yoga meditation, going to classes, meeting, you know, these kinds of like quote-unquote conscious people that were at the very least looking, you know, for higher levels of spirituality and intellect and the economy and the money on here as well. It kind of all coincided at once. And within a year I had literally taken, you know, business-like two X, three X, and I was still putting the work in, like I never got lazy. I was still in my minivan, you know, kind of homeless and go into salons, meeting clients at hotels, meeting clients at Starbucks restaurants anywhere and everywhere. And even still like the overheads in LA, as you might know, are crazily high. So the first couple of years, like I was doing more sales, but I had so many overheads. I wasn't really still making any money. And I was supporting, you know, the people as well at that time. What I realized is there's no, there is no like click and all of a sudden like, boom, your business to just doing amazingly better. All of a sudden there are small things you can do to shift things and then, you know, market and, and, you know, kind of increasing sales, but it's a, it's a combination of everything I did. And the work I put in all those years that eventually led to the last three years, being highly profitable, being highly successful, you know, working with celebrities you know, being invited to shows and in different places than clients flying in from all over the country to come and visit me personally. And you know, that that's been just an absolute blessing because as I said earlier, there were times when I was like, man, I'm going to have to find something else to do. I don't know what I'm going to do right now. And then as things develop, you know, as entrepreneurs, we don't just stick with one thing and just say, okay, that's it, it's on autopilot. Let me, let me go to sleep and play video games, stress to my life. No, I started doing other businesses. I started branching out into vacation rentals into the CBD and into now speaking and writing and being an author. And hopefully eventually the, with the ability to travel around and be paid as well. It's like kind of kickstart companies, a business team, sales teams help out kids in high school and people in prison, people in rehab who went going through addiction and that's kind of something that's really like fulfilling in my heart and aligned with like my like desires to help people. Like I just had, I think my dad put it in me and my mom possibly also, but just to just kind of try whatever I can do to like leave something off, found better than how I found it. And that's kinda like, that's where my heart is.

Host:

Awesome. Yeah. Hallelujah to that. I think there's a lot of it's out there like that too. And it's beautiful. What happened when you wrote that book in prison? I'm very curious, like what it did for you?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So the book is actually still being edited. It's the Meditation of the prisoner. However, what it is is the compilation of all the journals from prison. And, you know, I so recently I started writing a different book, which is my story from childhood and to how I've turned that into like, you know, I was running a successful and successful hair company. And at first, it just started out as like, you know, just stuff I was writing to myself, but eventually, I started seeing like, wow, like Rocky, like I don't even, I didn't have the awareness to know what I was even thinking back then until I looked back at it. So I'm looking back at all this stuff. And a lot of it's like, you know, crazy crosswords, criminal wild stuff, but in between there pieces, I realized like, well, Rocky, you were, you know, this, this higher level of intellectual spirituality that you think you just recently developed, you had quite a bit of it in you back. Daniel was just kind of covered up with different situations and circumstances and things. So looking back into all of that, I realized how powerful this could be for anyone, first of all. And then especially people that are in those situations, you know, to see like, Hey, you know, that's me, I relate to this column was perfect perfectly, and look what he's doing now. And he's going back and reading the stuff that he wrote way back then, and kind of commenting on it almost and bringing it to the present day. And I mean, , that meditation to the prisoner book will be released in the next couple of weeks now. And I'll reach out to everybody and let them know. But I just want to like, kind of like touch up the end of ending of it. Cause it's raw. It has all that I wrote from back then. And I kind of want to make that like, ending like kind of a segue into like, you know, the entire story, which will be still, I'm still a good couple months away from losing that one. Cause it's a, it's a pretty heartfelt pretty emotional book to write for me. But I am going through it.

Host:

I bet I can feel, I mean, going back and those memories it pulling yeah. Pulling, it's also probably like therapy almost as well in a sense of emotional therapy. And it's very you're very resilient. I don't know how you're extremely strong and it takes a lot and there are other people in your shoes. I have friends that have told me other stories that I'm flabbergasted at their strengths too. Like you, okay. Would you say going back into and basing those things is important also in looking at say that pain

Rocky Singh Kandola:

I knew for me personally, I've I definitely had to happen. I think for many people these days, like smoking marijuana was a big thing for me in the past right now I recently quit. Totally. And I realized when I did, I was like a lot of people don't recognize it, cause me marijuana is a subtle drug and this and that, that there's so much stuff and pain from the past, you're covering up and that you're not dealing with that dictates so many of your current present-day choices and programming and et cetera. So for me, I got to a place in my life maybe, maybe not even three or four years ago where businesses doing okay. Every other area of my life is good, but I'm still miserable. I'm still like waking up in the morning crying. I'm still driving to my office, with tears in my eyes, like I'm still like a lost and lonely feeling. And I realized like, you know what this has to do with this has to do something from my past. They're happy. And I don't want to, I know what growth feels like now. And I want it, I want growth, growth and growth. I want to keep progressing. And I realized like Noah, I can think of, it might be time to revisit all the way back to 11 and 12 years old. I had those journals from it from 12 years old when I was a kid and those boot camps. And I had forced myself to as painful as it was, you know, the last couple of years to kind of read them and get really into it. And I was shocked. I was looking at it. I was like, wow, is this a, is this really what a 12-year-old kid is riding right now? Like, you know what I mean? Like it was, I really think this kind of stuff at that age, you know, like was I done with the world and, and, and, and Matt, everybody, you know, at 12 years old, was I living in that much, you know, for survival type of mechanisms. And then I started realizing like, know, this is where, like, I have a big issue with trust and not just in relationships with everything around me, you know, I, I, I find myself realizing from childhood that the things that happened to me, I was, I was kind of taught myself that, you know, if I trust anything or anyone around me, I'm going to get, you know, kind of screwed over. So don't do that. And, you know, anyone can say code a psychologist, say, you know, you might have trust issues and stuff like that, but the power in diving into yourself and kind of doing that introspection and seeing it from your own eyes is, is great. And that's what I've started to see you know, by diving back into my past, by even reaching out to my mom and dad and ask them if the timelines, you know, and, and what, what happened back then which it's still tough for me to, you know, totally talk to them about it, but any of this stuff. And when I first start doing podcasts, they were there visibly, you know, verbally, you know, pretty upset at me, you know? And like, Y Y if we didn't say this schools would've killed herself and blah, blah, blah. And I was like, mom and dad, I know you guys have good intentions. You know, it's, everything is okay, I'm just, I need to do this for myself right now. I'm trying to figure out why at 35 years old now that I'm still kind of having these almost kiddish tendencies sometimes of, of the fall programming and, you know, and to, if you really want to become aware of that and kind of quote, unquote defeated or move through it, or, you know, grow beyond it, I believe that it does help a lot if, whether you have journals or not until, you know, sit down and to really, to, to meditate back and really meditate upon your life and, and reflect on what you've done and who you were and how you thought and how you've grown from there.

Host:

I think it is important to what we call to check in with, with what's going on inside. And once we start to become more awakened beings, we start looking at that and, and just not just living like an automaton and going back to, again, that we're something greater, we're much greater. We are, we're highly advanced quantum beings and these emotions are what makes us special as a human. It's almost the most special thing that there is as a human in a sentence, you know, we've got our physical, we've got our mental bodies are emotional and it's kind of governs quite a bit. And if we don't take a look at those, I've, I've heard terms like you got to open up your backpack or what's in your closet, basically in order to start becoming that more happy being in a whole being, you know, we're all in the search for happiness. We have to start somewhere and in actually digging in and going in and looking at basing those little things that, as you said, smoking marijuana, it didn't help it covered it up. And I can't smoke this stuff at all. It's just sort of, yeah. Another subject. I was curious also about your philosophy, your philosophy graduate and why you chose philosophy as a major.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So when I first started college, my father's a physician, so I was 17 years old, just graduated from a WWASP program in Canada. And I was starting college at the university of south Alabama. And my dad said, if you want to go to school, you're going to have to go pre-med and you need to take chem biology, physics, and calculus, your first semester, 18 hours full-load pre-med. And I hated it. I was like, you know what, dad, you're a doctor called. This is not for me. So from there, I went to business and I went to a couple of different majors. And finally, I settled on law school. I wanted to go to law school and I wanted to become an advocate for, you know, the things I went through. I wanted to help kids get out of these places. I wanted to help people wrongfully convicted with, you know, unjust sentences and et cetera, et cetera. Some of the problems in, our justice system today. I wanted to be a warrior like on the front line of those types of things. However, you know, faith didn't have that in store for me, whatever you want to call it. I got accepted into law school after my philosophy degree and was sitting in jail and was told that, Hey you're not going to go to school. You're, you'll be going up the road to the state penitentiary. And we'll see you in a couple of years. And by the time I had made it through that time, when I got out, I didn't have the desire to go to any more schooling and to do anything professional either. I think while I was in prison, I really realized that you know, I'm an entrepreneur, I'm a, I called it a hustler back then. You know, and it's still a hustle like I'm an entrepreneur and that is what I'm going to do. So I'm going to have to figure out a way to put those skills to use and do something legitimate eventually. So I can, you know, make it, cause when I first got out, I was, I know back in the same lifestyle, I don't know what else to do. I just, I didn't have, I didn't get rehabilitated. I didn't get educated. And I had to educate myself whatever I did. And I didn't have too much motivation or inspiration or, or you know, or empowerment so that I could do anything anymore at that point in my life. So I kind of dove back in until that, until, you know, maybe a year or two later, when I decided to make that shift and say, Hey, I'm leaving, I'm sitting behind all my distractions, everything that's holding me back. That's not serving me, I'm letting go of it. So yeah, the philosophy degree was, was just an idea something that I actually still have in my heart. I just don't feel the need anymore to get a professional degree, to change the world or to change myself or to change my community. I think, you know, that's just part of the programming. Society wants you to follow intake and I don't have anything against it. I think that you know, the professionals that we have in this country are needed for a multitude of reasons, but I feel that you can be impactful and powerful. Whether you are a professional or not, whether you're a college grad or not, whether you have been in prison or not it's all about, you know, like we're speaking about finding that awareness, spreading yourself, those distractions, believing that you can, and then taking that action to do it and move forward with it.

Host:

Yes. You must have a great fighting spirit within you to just take everything and say buys via later and totally detach that's. Wow. Did you just wake up in the morning and have an epiphany or?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

It was definitely a higher power, but the higher power came to me slightly through my father as well. My father always sent me to like all these different schools I speak about, you know, we butted heads. We physically, you know, slapped me and beat me up when I was a kid, like for a good reason, mostly. But he came to me one day on November 4th, 2013. And he was like, Hey, you're done with your prison. You had your teeth back now. You know, you're doing okay. You know, I don't know what's going on with you, but you don't talk to us anymore. So if you want to, you know, why don't you just leave, leave the country, I'll pay for it. And the way he said it, you know, it was like humble. It was like caring. And I was like, you know what? It took me like an hour maybe. And something came to me. I was like, I'm going. I was like, I was out of prison. I had all my stuff back. I had, I was making money illegally on the street. I had, you know, my circles, I had girlfriends, I had cars, I had a place and I was like, Nah, I don't want this again. I don't want this anymore. I hadn't, I was no trouble. It was not like in reaction to anything. It was it was intuition. I've learned a lot about intuition and the difference between tuition anxiety. And I realize that those intuitive moments come to you in silence and they come to you calmly and peacefully. And that's how it came to me. And I said, yes. And I left. And that was the beginning of my news, it has been a journey I've been up and down since then quite a bit. But that was one of the better decisions of my life.

Host:

I love that about intuition, ditto, our sixth sense. I just did an interview with Dr Charles light Walker on that, on medical intuitive out there that are teaching us how to use our sixth sense that we're not trained with. That's another thing that we need to add in our school systems need revamping direly in the intuition aspect yet, and going silence and meditation, it looks like it's woven into your, to your path. And then also the seeking mentors. It's almost like you've got a prescription for success.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Not. And I still keep that to this day. Like my routine looks like I wake up, you know because as long as we don't have late nights or do anything late at night, I'm up around six 30 by six 30. I'm on my couch with a book in my hand, Paulo Coelho you know, at Cartel lay a number of different books. And I, before I get in my books, I do a small because I'm really not. And people, I think the meditation is just, oh, you can just, I mean, like I'm still, I've been there three years now. I'm still not like anywhere where I want to be. I can sit down and close my eyes and cautiously meditate for about five to 10 minutes right now. And when I try to do that, try to kind of make it throughout my day. I take those in the morning to kind of check-in and make like, like a conscious decision to do it. And then throughout the day, like, as I'm doing different things, I'll kind of just kind of quiet myself inside. I'll be on a walk or I'll be like an in-between client and she'll be sitting somewhere and I'll just kind of quiet myself and kind of reflect a little bit we're out the one that taped by, you know, Dr Dyer or, you know, a number of other people that kind of like that's a meditation of itself, especially when you really tune into what some of these older guys and stuff were saying about, you know, our mindset, our attitudes and our lives. It's a meditation in of itself. And you know, from there I start my day and, you know, go to the gym and it's, it's, it's beautiful and I love it. And I've kept some semblance of that routine with everything going on and COVID and stuff for the last, almost four years now. And, you know, with the, with the healthy eating, with, you know, high alkaline diet, you know, know me to stop smoking cigarettes, stop smoking weed. I stopped drinking hard liquor. So like it's a constant thing, right? Like tomorrow morning I might wake up and say, you know what I need to stop, you know, using sulfates in my shampoo, whatever kind of chemicals I'm putting in me.

Host:

I did that a long time ago.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

I've never understood it, but now I'm like, oh, that's a lot of chemicals along into my hair directly to my head. So maybe I should think about that.

Host:

Right, right. Becoming aware of what we're, what the products we're using. And the chemicals are really important. I love what you said. Even the five or 10 minutes of meditation, I've done several podcasts on meditation and the power of. And even I have a new science show. My first five science shows to talk about the rewiring of the brain and how meditation plays into it wiring faster, rewiring, much faster, lots of information and research out there, proving the power of meditation in bringing us quicker, you know, into a happier state of peaceful state. Let's put it that way. Happy is kind of a hard word these days. You know, getting us into alignment, balance and peak. And then when we operate from there, it sounds, I'm hearing it right from you and me, and I experienced this in that alignment balance. We're able to make better decisions. We're able to give out to our love or, or whatever play, you know, live, live life. Right. That's the way it's simple. It's we're oh boy, I think we get too serious actually. Sometimes, you know, in a sense of...

Rocky Singh Kandola:

I'm guilty. I do sometimes.

Host:

Well hearing all the things that you've gone through. Okay. That is gravely serious, but coming out of it, look what you've done. Look what you look, how you've stepped out of that. And, and now just you're like a prince, you know, what are they, what's the story of the frog in print? So it's, it's a, it's a matter of them looking at it. Okay. Thank you. I have that experience and I'm going to do something with it. It's very painful. That's hard, but we, somehow we have to look at those things in a sense and then move on. Right. It's, it's tough for all of us. Just experience and hard past experience. It's, exactly. I mean, like

Rocky Singh Kandola:

You find that, you know, resilience in yourself and, and see like, that's why I like to do these talks also. And hopefully, people listen to them because like, there's no shortcut from a to Z, right. But you can kind of learn from other's experiences. Some people can learn from those experiences. And for those of us that can, you know, please listen to what I'm saying. Like at between 10 and 17, all the schools, I went to all the trauma that happened, all the bad stuff to happen. I could have taken it back then and, you know, shifted that into like, Hey, let me go ahead and do something better in different more. Now, however, I, I had taken a fit of anger, stent, took me against the world and it took that, you know, now everyone that caused me pain, they're about to pay for pain. And that led me to 10 times more pain that led me to prison. It led me to rehab, led me to hospitals, let me almost dying. And you know, I still didn't learn until, you know, as I said, I had a spiritual awakening. So, you know, it's, it's, it's not easy. And a lot of people, for those of us that need to learn from our own experience, you're going to have to go through, you know, some, some tough times. The whole thing is, is, is eventually, you know, you have to realize like, Hey, do I want this? Do I want this? You know, is this what I want? And if the answer is no, you know, then, boom, you have the awareness right there. That's two where nest at the beginning of the right

Host:

They're taking charge. Yes, exactly. Oh, true. Oh, what do I want? What is it that I want instead of the reactive or dictation around and the influence? No, wait for a second here. What about, what is it that I want, what am I here for? That's an excellent, excellent point taking that stance and responsibility for this and me and where I'm at, where I'm going, what do I want to create? Right. There's the journey that is real. And then all the unknowns and everything and all this stuff, you've got to let go off. And it's like, oh my gosh, the creative journey is so incredible. It's like, oh it's kind of like people when they talk about being retired, right. They go out and they go, and they're used to being dictated and where to go, what to do, do this, do that. And all of a sudden, oh, they're free. And what, you know, boom, I'm 60 something and I'm retired and they don't know what to do. So let him go back. But it's almost that journey of making that happen before, quote-unquote, retirement, making yourself, create your light, be the creator of what, if everything you're doing, what you want to do. This is, I mean, it's kind of hard. I'm trying to get this across, but it's what you're saying as well, sparking that. Who am I, what am I here for?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

It's I think that as a society, society of hall, we've had so much programming. This is how you're supposed to do things. This is the way it goes, that we forget how powerful we are, that we can do anything we want to do. We can create, especially in today's world with the amount of, you know, technology and money and abundance that we live in. We can all do whatever we want to do. Whether no matter where you are, who you are, what you're doing, what your disability is, limitations, you might think are, you can create exactly what you want to create around you. And once you know that, once you realize that, like those thoughts that you're having of, you know, do you do have it rest? You don't have, it will be true, whether you believe it to be true, whether you believe it, not to be sure it will come out to be like that. And we can find it within ourselves. Like you just started grading. And I mean, the thing is like a lot of people see social media and TV these days. And what's glorified is, you know, having a jet and flying to a private island and being on a rep video or being a celebrity or being a music superstar, something like that. And in reality, happiness and success and fulfilment is not even on those levels. Most of the people that I know that have that amount of money are not happy, you know, like, for whatever reason, there's a multitude of different reasons. They're not. It's more about, creating exactly what you want. Kind of like learning that balance between like of, of wanting and meeting almost right. Cause like our needs as humans can be met, you know, our basic needs can be met very easily. From there, you know, we all have wants and desires. We can ship those wants and desires into goals and, and, you know, kind of manifestations almost. You're gonna start creating more than you can ever. Imagine. For me, two years ago I was living downtown LA and my house and my ex-wife had already moved out. I was living alone. I'll sit on his garden was broken. I was when I started, you know, trying to figure out, you know, what's going on, you can check it in the past. But I had developed a new identity and I was okay, Rocky is successful because he has a downtown condo on staple centre and he's doing business there and blah, blah, blah. And I let go of all of it. I gave away almost everything. I owned my suits, my shoes, my dishes, my towels, my sheets, my furniture to the homeless people all around, you know, downtown LA. And there are some things way to friends as well. And I got all my items and blogging's down to a suitcase, a backpack, a tennis bag, and a carry on suitcase. And that right there, you know, already going through spiritual development where I've been moving slowly throughout the last years, that just sparked something in the universe that has brought me so, so much like unexpectedly unasked for that. Now I am like, ''What can I give away''? It feels good at first. And the universe kind of recognizes that energy is like, okay, you know what? It's time he's making space for new things and better things. It's time to go ahead and give it to them.

Host:

I experienced that in the past year here, I went on a mobile journey and I got everything okay. We're living in our fans. But then I ended up getting a little camper, the band wasn't big enough for me to build out. And I didn't know how so van in the camper there, I went just, okay, this is it. We're, we're going to go mobile nomad. I went nomadic. I went through, oh boy, the journey, lots of spiritual deaths in the journey. I thought I was not going to make it many times because I'd never pulled anything in my camper or anything. And that was difficult, to begin with. A lot of weight on it. I couldn't travel very fast. And I wrote, I wrote a book on it upon my desert journey. And it was really like kind of a right. Can relate it to some of your experiences in the way of that feeling of going out on the edge and getting rid of, or getting just saying okay, by, by, by detaching, from everything and just going, I was going right out, straight out into the unknown, had no idea. And then as I went and got to where I wanted to go because I had had a feeling I've been here before in this area, everything started, like you said, coming back, coming in the beauty every, and it was like? Oh wow. And there's also research. I've done several shows on how we downsize helps our wellbeing as well and happier, lighter as you, as you mentioned not having so many things around us to lightening up.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

It's a beautiful feeling. And I, and I still like, even now I'm moving, I'm moving into a new place now. And like, I still am very anxious, like, okay, I don't want to have anything extra that on me. I mean, just whatever is needed, but there's a balance there, right? Like what to make your mom beautiful. You want to put some nice plants up? You want to put a couple of decorations up? I mean, that's okay. And just for me, like the place I was at downtown, just boxes and boxes of stuff, excess of dishes, excess of sheets. I had six suits, you know, 20 pairs of shoes and this and that and this and that. I was like, no, I don't want any of this stuff anymore. It's my parents. Like what you gave all those suits. We bought two away,

Host:

Especially from your culture. Those suits are very important

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Was like, at that point too, I had lost some too and everything. They didn't fit me anymore either. So I was like, and I was like, why am I hanging on to this stuff anymore? Like, wait, what am I doing? Let me, let me get rid of all of this.

Host:

Yeah, It does feel good to lighten up. That might be a really good first step for a lot of people, you know, wondering where to start because it does, it clears your declutters your mind and helps you clarify more and asking those questions that we need to be asking ourselves, you know, that getting that file feedback that's all out there. All of this information is there for us to become if we're finding ourselves unhappy in some way, some sort anything I would say start there. We need to question ourselves. It's right there. Okay. Dead in the tracks. Okay. Why am I upset right now? I mean, that's literally like I, if we can come to that, it just feels so much better. I mean, it's just a beautiful feeling and those are the things we want to experience in life. It's those, that beauty and those beautiful feelings that we're supposed to be experiencing that in the back Len and all this other negativity and everything, you know, going through that's, you know, that we're done. I see where we're worrying and we want to bring in life real life.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

One thing going off what you said, it's helped me to kind of like really view myself, you know, from an outside perspective of as still myself as a kind of imagine like that. And don't, don't try to feel yourself from like the first person kind of step back from yourself outside of yourself and kind of be the observer of the person that's had. His thoughts are happening too. And see it from like that kind of like outside perspective has kind of used to confuse me or think about how to do it as well. But when you listen to a couple of tapes and books about, you know, kind of shipping outside perspective and looking from the outside and yourself. Exactly. And it makes sense and you can kind of slow down and understand like, Hey, why am I really, why is this person fluent? It's not observing Rocky feel like this is about Rocky lights from out here, why what's going on. And you can kind of start to see that better than.

Host:

Yes. And looking at it also takes looking at that perspective stepping back takes away that self-judgment, which is so vital to, to, to get rid of that program. It's a program. Did you have some of that experience with, with your after death or near-death experiences, like where you felt like more and more of your goal was going away? Sense?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Yeah. do you guys have been a big one for me? I mean, I used to be that person that thought that I was untouchable you know, couldn't, I couldn't be touched. I couldn't be killed even. And you know, life has the gentle way of reminding you, you know and humbling. And that's kind of what happened to me. It was a number of experiences, you know, like a number of times where I'd almost, you know, God or been stabbed in my arm or lost one of my arms or something like that. I started kind of slowly realizing that you know, like this ego that I have in me that pushes me to fight and to yell and to argue and to want to be right. And every situation is just not serving me, you know, it's just, and so I think it comes back to the awareness of making that conscious choice in the shift of saying, you know what? This happened to me, this person spits on me or call me a name. Now I have the choice. I can get mad and get reacted to them and let it bother me. Or I can smile and understand that he might be going through something that he might have lost a child, or he might have something who knows what happened, you know, whatever it is I can choose to just stand love back. And that's a tough choice to make for a lot of people, a lot of situations, but like anything practise it, you build that muscle up and it'll start, come naturally. And I mean, I was literally that person 10, 15 years ago that I would have little wrenches in my car. So anyway, had roadway driven me. I would throw something at them. Like I was, I was, I was wild. I was fighting all the time randomly. And I'll always notice like, why are these people bothering me? Why did I get pulled over? Why is that person looking like that? Why am I getting any arguments? And now like,

Host:

It just doesn't happen. Okay. So store wild said, basically whatever you put out in the universe, you're going to get back. He's not the only one it's just that you mentioned through your experience that you used to be angry and that you would start running into all these problems for, and then now, oh, well, I don't feel that because I've worked at it, I've practised and brought myself out of those angry patterns. I'd looked at myself and now you're getting back from universities, beautiful synchronicities, matching energy. Basically, this is scientific. It is that, that we're there match that energy. There is matching how you are resonating.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Exactly. A hundred per cent true. I've, I've actually felt it in it myself. Now. I was actually the type that was like, ah, those hippies or something like that, you know, back then. But as I'm growing up, I felt these things myself. I understand now as some of the most, the coolest, you know, secrets of the universe for some of the most simple things, and that's why they rejected by so many people. And if we can just get back to understanding and following that, I think I would say, I would say both.

Host:

Yes. Awesome. I have more questions, but we've already gone over here a little bit. I think if I asked you maybe another interview, I try to keep these to an hour Rocky. I just really quick, do you support any nonprofits or causes?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So I'm actually working on starting a nonprofit for myself right now. What I do is sponsor a couple of kids in the village in India. And then I work with hairstyles for hope for my business. And I want to start a nonprofit that my assistant is working on for cancer patients and medical patients because I have hair products to be able to provide them high-quality wigs and stuff. That's not hurting the economy by, you know, raping insurance companies or, you know, people's pockets I'm working at. It's kind of tough. There are a lot of people in this space already that are making a lot of money, so a lot of resistance to it, but we are working on it.

Host:

Awesome. And then how can people find you Rocky if they want to get in touch with you?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Definitely. So I'll make a joke that I'm like the easiest person to be married to the fine on every social media platform. I have no website as well. My name is Rocky Singh Kandola. My website is just Rockykandola.com from there, you can find links to my blogs, my podcast, all the businesses I've started. As well as get in touch with me directly via phone, email, or text.

Host:

These were, I think we're gonna just wrap it up here. Rocky. I really loved talking with you. Thank you so much. It's been a pleasure to interview you so much, I must say