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The Suicide Prevention Movement with Ms Jackie & Rocky Singh Kandola

We're about to go into a place that many people have never contemplated. Thank goodness, because we're going to go behind bars and into what really creates prisoners. Let’s start with what’s the definition of a prisoner? What's the definition of a jail? What if not all jails have bars?


Jackie:

Welcome to the suicide prevention show, where we are waking up the world. And we're about to go into a place that many people have never contemplated. Thank goodness, because we're going to go into what creates prisoners and what is the definition of a prisoner. And as it says, what's the definition of a jail. And to take us on that journey, I'd like you to help me welcome to the studio. Rocky, Rocky, join us. Turn on your camera. Let's go for this.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

All of us, Jackie. Good morning.

Jackie:

Yay. I like your flowers. Do what you love.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Yes. Yes. All right.

Jackie:

So what do you love right now before we get into anything heavy and deep dive in, what do you love?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

I'm thinking about it right now. I love my morning routine. I wake up early at the meditation. I relax. I sit down, I go to the gym, I clean up. I kind of just focus on what I'm about to do for the day and slowly get into my work a little bit interested in emails and I love it. I love having my early mornings and they, you know, get me started on the right foot every day.

Jackie:

Cool, cool, cool. Cool. All right, we're going to talk about jail. We're gonna talk about prison. We're going to talk about all of these things because you have a very unique perspective. So why don't you give some story, introduce people to who you are and how you came to be talking about this?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Definitely. So my name is Rocky Singh Kandola. I'm 35 years old. I currently live in Los Angeles. I was born in New York City. My parents were first-generation directly from India. So jumping right in the way. You're speaking about ‘’jail’’ and prisons and institutions for me started at a very young age. Starting from 11 years old, I started going to institutions and boot camps or gulags schools. They call them all across the world from Mexico to Canada. Places that are now shut down from, you know, child abuse, rape, torture and all kinds of stuff like that that are still in operation. So from the young age of 11 to about 17/18, that was my life. A lot of it was in survival mode, fight or flight mode.

Jackie:

Wait a minute, hold it. You got to slow this down a little bit, a Gulag school?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

That's like a name for them. Like what they kind of call them. If you don't the actual name for the ones I went to were called the Worldwide association of speciality programs where basically, yeah.

Jackie:

It was pretty, you know, positive the worldwide association of speciality programs.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Exactly. And they worked very hard to make them sound and look, you know, pretty positive. And you know, a lot of them have been uncovered recently with Paris Hilton doing a big documentary called this is Paris you know, where she went to one of those schools as well in us. And you know, there, there anything could be further from the truth. You know, there are very abusive and very manipulative both to the parents that are looking to just, you know, help their child out and not sure where to turn and feeling overwhelmed and as well as the children who go through them.

Jackie:

So I'm going to ask a couple of questions about this Rocky, if you don't mind, because what would prompt a parent to go looking for a speciality school?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

You know, from a personal stance, my father was just starting a practice, you know, in Mississippi new to the country as well. And you know, from what they're used to in India, they're used to very mindful kids because listen and study and go home and respect their elders. And I was a bit of a louder child. I was very outspoken, very talkative, very, very hyper I was wanting to be out and about. And they just didn't know how to deal with me. And then my two twin brothers and sisters and you know, I was kind of the black sheep that they didn't, they couldn't control couldn't handle. So I think it was kind of an innocent thing. He just started looking in the back of newspaper ads and finally saw one that said, Hey, do you want to reclaim your child and bring love back into your family? And him being in a high functioning that doctors wanted to handle the issue quickly, he just kinda called I'm not sure how much research he did, but he, he just went from there and they're not overwhelmed and signed me up and off. I went.

Jackie:

So you went into a program to that from your dad's point of view, was to help reclaim you into the family with love exactly what happened.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So I went to the same program twice. The first time I was 11 or 12, the second time I was about 17. The second time I was actually like, basically kidnapped out of my bed with my ankles, because of my hands' cuff and escorted by these two guys that were so tall and had to turn off my fan in the bedroom for them to stand over me. The first time I was told that I was going to be going to a nice summer camp, we'll spend some time there and they were going to help me. And there was like just these and pools and this and that. And my mother flew with me to San Diego and dropped me off there. And we drove down and Sonata. And as soon as we got, there were these big four walls, a red building and you get in and everything seems okay enough. But as soon as you get to the point where you leave your mother and you go to the next door everything changes, the hallways, get dirty, the lights get dark, they start screaming at you and pushing you, ripping your clothes off, cutting your hair pursing at you and telling you, we don't know how long they're going to be here, written over here for a very long time. You know, so get used to it and it just gets the second you walk past those doors, you're like, you're in shock. You sleep in the hallway for 10 days. You've woken up in the middle of the night at 2:00 AM to do ahead in the rain. There's no communication with the outside world nor with your peers inside. Everything's very strict and regimented and kind of built around a brainwashing type of mentality. As well as, you know, physically, sexually and mentally abusive staff.

Jackie:

Wow. How long were you in that environment being cut off from your parents?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

The first time I was there for seven months and the second time at 17, I was there for roughly the same time.

Jackie:

So for seven months, your parents had no contact with you?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Exactly. We were allowed to write letters once a week and receive letters from our parents only however, they were severely redacted. If we said anything negative or manipulative, as they seemed, you know, about the program, what was happening, they would give it back to us and tell us to rewrite it. You know, phone calls could be heard and at a certain time on stage and I never got to that level. Because you know, it's a business, a for-profit business. If, if the children are getting out too fast they're not going to make any money. So the only way to get out was either to be graduated, the program, which they don't tell you how long it takes to be pulled out by our parents or to wait until you're 18. And then at 18, you get put on the border of the US Mexico with $50 and a bus ticket. We were taught that since day one. And that's the program.

Jackie:

Okay. So the good news is you said these, those were shut down.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Well, no. There's many of them still in existence that the program, in particular, I went to WWASP has the ownership. A lot of them still work in the industry but they've changed names and reopened different areas. I had the chance to visit the one that I went to as a kid in Mexico and paid a guard to walk through. I made a YouTube video about walking through so many of the brothers and sisters. I went there with like, wow, thank you. Like my nightmare is so much worse. I'm so glad it's closed. However, as we're talking I've learned that there's another one open about an hour and a half away from that school. So they're continuously popping up again and again.

Jackie:

So this is a case of parents be aware, watch out for the promises and anything that prevents you from having contact with your kids. So, oh my God. When you came out of that program what happened next for you?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So I was about 12 or 13 and when I came out of the school I was in before you know, all my friends, you know, from, you know, grade school, growing up, I was sent automatically to a quote-unquote like high-class private school about 30 minutes away from my home that my father bought a home there for us to hold our, this private school. And, you know, me, just coming out of this situation, I was in most of the kids there, you know, had issues with drugs and gangs and violence. And we're quite a bit older than me. I was one of the youngest ones there. So to be from that, put into like this type of school, all of a sudden, and then these people already knew my story because they heard me on the, on the roll call for six months while I show up, because I was in this school, they were like, oh, Rocky's that kid that stole his parents' car and got sent to Mexico. And now he's in school with us. So I already had this kind of build-up there. And that time there, I was taken out of that school, maybe six months later after a kid, you know, said something means to me and I kind of threatened him back. And you know, that was kind of my reaction at that time. If someone tries to bother me or hurt me, I felt like I would have to lash back very quickly. Otherwise, I'll be seen as someone that could be hurt and taken advantage of. So getting kicked out of there just kind of spiralled into me going from there to military school and then to another facility and then back to Catholic boarding school and public school. And then when I was in the public school, back in my hometown, where I started I quickly kind of fell into the crowd of like partying and drinking you know, at 17 years old. And on the way back from spring break, one year I got pulled over by the police. I wasn't driving, but we had alcohol in the car and got charged with minors in possession of alcohol and a week or so later I came home late one night. I saw my father on the couch and I already knew that like what could happen to be, to me to get sent to these schools, he was already upset with me. So I closed my door. I put my desk in front of my door, my dog and my room kept like a hammer and knife under my bed. And I was scared to sleep. But somehow they opened the door without me hearing it, called my dog out and woke me up with my hands and my feet cuffs. And I was headed back to the same facility or different facility by the same program with actually the same owners who kind of like when I was there at the first time, he like, basically beat me up, kicked me down the hallway and tied my hands and feet behind my back for 1, 2, 3, 4 days. It was. But I laid on the ground and had nothing but orange juice and rice twice a day. And I was heading back there and I was on the border of Canada, New York and Ogdensburg.

Jackie:

Toledo. Your parents had no clue about what was going on in school?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

They didn't. I remember when I first got out, I tried to tell them a little bit and I told them like you know, what happened? And you know that the sexual stuff, the physical stuff. And they were kind of like a little bit sceptical of it. You know, at this point, the schools had told them that your kids are going to manipulate you. They're going to lie to you. So don't believe anything they say.

Jackie:

Wow, okay. So this is a professional brainwashing program. They didn't only brainwash you, they brainwash your parents.

Rocky Singh Kandola:

Exactly. Exactly.

Jackie:

So this is like, holy crap, Rocky. I had no idea that when we were talking about prison and jails, you weren't kidding. You didn't even have to be in jail. I mean, you were a kid, you weren't in jail, you were sent to school for parents trying to reclaim you into the family with the loan. Holy crap. All right. So now you're out of this program, you've graduated. You turned 18?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

17. My parents pulled me out when I was 17 after I had graduated high school from there with a fake diploma because the school wasn't accredited even take it out on Diplomas. So I had a fake diploma.

Jackie:

All right. So you're, you're almost a high school graduate and you're back home. What happened next?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So I got accepted into the local university of south Alabama and started college right away. And you know, when I got out, I kind of, had a pretty big chip on my shoulder. I was, I was an adult now and you couldn't tell me anything, authority, nothing at all. I dove headfirst into a lifestyle of partying, doing drugs, selling drugs, women violence, you know, towards me and towards others. Just a crazy, crazy lifestyle that, you know, only lasted for a short couple of years until I was finally arrested for, you know, big changes. And in between there, I got arrested multiple times for possession of drugs and drinking and being out and things of that nature. Until finally I was arrested for the distribution of controlled substances with a hundred COVID sting operation by the federal government and the state government, the local government working together. And that started my time into actual real, they call it big boy jail or prison.

Jackie:

Oh boy. You know, a whole language that most of us don't know anything about big boy jail. Yeah. So what you've got going on in your life now is so dramatically different from this story. What turned it around for you?

Rocky Singh Kandola:

So after I got out of prison I was still re